Flamingo Rampant Book Club!

queerbookclub:

S. Bear Bergman (author of trans children’s books Backwards Day and The Adventures of Tulip, Birthday Wish Fairy) is launching a project to deliver new, diverse picture books directly to schools, families and libraries!

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PSA to trans and NB people, and anyone who has a need to use a name other than your legal one

aiffe:

You can get checks written to the name you use, and if you have a bank account under your legal name, sign the check with both names to deposit it. The bankers will think the check was written to someone else, so it’s good to make the signatures different, but it’s not fraud since the check was written to you, just under your preferred name.

I know for a lot of people the workplace can be hostile because you’d like to you know, earn real money like a real adult without feeling punched in the gut with dysphoria, and legal name changes can have a lot of stupid barriers and red tape. (In the US it varies by state, but there are a lot of barriers to queer people and the economically disadvantaged in general, such as fees of several hundred dollars, or requirements that you have lived in the same place for a year or more, which discriminates against transience, much more common for the poor, and for youth in general, especially queer youth who may have had to escape their families.) You often need money to fight this to GET that legal name change, and it’s kind of a catch-22 when you are trying to get out of living someone else’s life and be called by your own damn name. Co-workers can’t misname you if they only have one name for you.

Full-time jobs with big companies will often require more credentials, but you can find informal work that pays with cash or check and doesn’t ask for ID. And yes being queer can basically force you to live like an illegal immigrant in your own country, sucks don’t it.

A final warning: if whoever wrote the check is determined to out you, they can ask their bank to see who cashed the check, like if they claim they think there was fraud. If you give them no reason to think that isn’t your legal name, they probably would never think of this, but they can do it. Though you can always claim you don’t have a bank account and asked your brother/sister/mom/dad/etc to cash it for you.

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janetmock:

Trans women featured in a celebratory space in Marie Claire magazine.
They applaud Redefining Realness’ bestsellers status as well as feats accomplished by Carmen Carrera, Laverne Cox and Laura Jane Grace. 
#girlslikeus Takeover!

janetmock:

Trans women featured in a celebratory space in Marie Claire magazine.

They applaud Redefining Realness’ bestsellers status as well as feats accomplished by Carmen Carrera, Laverne Cox and Laura Jane Grace. 

#girlslikeus Takeover!

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queerbookclub:

Queer books out in July 2014. Know any others?

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specialkchocolateydelight:

Let’s be clear.

"I don’t support the gay lifestyle" is homophobic.

I am a queer person. Everything I do is inherently queer, from paying my bills to getting my queer freak on.

If you don’t think that I should be able to live as a queer person, then you are homophobic and we are not friends.

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breakthecitysky:

Here is the thing I can’t stop thinking about with what’s happened here in Minnesota over the course of the past week: the display of support in the Twin Cities was staggering.  The level of f*cks not given to those who might be offended by this acknowledgement of equal rights under the law was amazing.

But mostly, mostly.  I think about a queer kid, riding in the back of her parents’ car seeing the city lit up like this.  Maybe she hasn’t come out yet, maybe she’s been bullied, at home, at school, for being who she is.  I can only imagine what seeing this would mean.  And then I get teary and proud all over again.  

Way to go, Minnesota.  Who’s next?

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fuckyeahsexeducation:

On using the word “dyadic” in this post on seeing more representations of various groups of people in our schools.

Dyadic is the word for people who aren’t intersex, intersex people being people with a certain condition where either through chromosomes, hormones, or anatomy they have a combination of features that are found in both men and women. 

This is all based on several conversations I’ve had with various Intersex people and some resources I’m beginning to look at to learn more about these conditions and the social oppression Intersex people face. Of course Intersex people are welcome to correct or chime in.

Well I think it’s really important that we talk about the exclusion and oppression of intersex people more and not just lumping it in with gender and orientation discussions. Many intersex people have different kinds of feelings about their gender, some feel intersex to be their gender, some feel that it’s their sex, some feel that it’s a medical condition that has nothing to do with sex or gender. Because intersex people can identify as cis or trans* or neither when talking about their oppression (in this particular case leaving out intersex people in curriculum) it doesn’t cut it to just say “cis men” because some intersex people identify as cis men and it’s still left out that they’re intersex if they’re talked about at all or they’re not talked about because they are intersex. I think it’s important to recognize dyadic privilege as its own thing and to put that divide that there are cis dyadic men (or maybe dyadic cis men would be a better phrasing) that have privilege over intersex cis men.


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Let’s stop claiming that certain genders and sexualities “reinforce the gender binary.” In the past, that tactic has been used to dismiss butches and femmes, bisexuals, trans folks and our partners, and feminine people of every persuasion. Gender isn’t some faucet that we can turn on and off in order to appease other people, whether they be heterosexist bigots or queerer-than-thou hipsters. How about this: Let’s stop pretending that we have all the answers, because when it comes to gender, none of us is fucking omniscient.

-- Julia Serano, “Performance Piece,” from Gender Outlaws: The Next Generation Ed. Kate Bornstein and S. Bear Bergman (via bisexual-books)
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Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender survey finds nearly 4 in 10 rejected by family or friend

ryansallans:

Over the past ten years our nation has seen several progressive shifts toward the treatment of the LGBT community, but sadly there is still a long road ahead. Near data from the PEW Research Center finds that 4 in 10 LGBT individuals are rejected by friends or family. When looking at youth and research from the Family Acceptance Project in San Francisco, those who are rejected are 8 times more likely to attempt suicide and also struggle with mental and physical health problems as they age. More needs to be done to support our LGBT-identified friends and family. If you know someone, reach out to them today. If you identify as LGBTQA then please reach out to someone you trust. 

-Ryan

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Making Sense in and of the Asexual Community: Navigating Relationships and Identities in a Context of Resistance - Chasin - 2014 - Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology - Wiley Online Library

tristifere:

pissabled:

tristifere:

greenchestnuts:

The Asexual Agenda linked to a new paper out by CJ Chasin about asexual communities, and it’s quite interesting. This is the part that struck me most strongly:

If a gay, lesbian, or bisexual individual distressed about being gay, lesbian, or bisexual seeks clinical help from a psychologist, then according to the American Psychological Associations Resolution on Appropriate Affirmative Responses to Sexual Orientation Distress and Change Efforts (APACR, 2009), the psychologist should help the client resolve issues of distress without trying to change the clients sexual orientation. In other words, psychologists should never engage in corrective/reparative therapy, which the American Psychological Association has deemed unethical (Anton, 2010). Additionally, the Guidelines for Psychotherapy with Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Clients affirm psychologistsethical obligations to oppose ideas of LGB people as mentally ill because of their sexual orientations. These further require psychologists to strive to understand the stigmatisation and prejudice that LGB people face and their impact on mental health (APA, 2012). Unfortunately, APAs Council of Representatives did not include asexuality in their definition of sexual orientation, and psychologists currently have no expressed obligation either to accept asexuality or to avoid trying to cureit. As a profession, psychology has yet to articulate any ethical or professional position against corrective/reparative therapy targeting asexuality or asexual/ ace people. Until this happens, the profession is actively complicit in sexualnormative, sexual-centric anti-asexual social hostility.

But there are lots of other interesting bits, too. I recommend reading it if you can get a copy.

CJ Chasin’s previous papers (check out cj.chasin.ca for a full list of published papers) have been amazing as well. I’ve downloaded this one and can’t wait to read it. We need kick-ass ace academics like this :3

yess this paper is so good, also cj is the best

Yay! I’m not the only one who thinks CJ is awesome!

Over at the Asexual Agenda, she has given a link to an earlier draft version of the paper, so people without access to the published article can still read a significant portion of what she published.

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